YOUR FAMILY STUDIES:

How do you begin finding your Poggioreale ancestors?

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So, you want to study your Poggioreale family? Where do you begin? 

Here are some suggestions from PIA friend and consultant, Marilyn Maniscalco Henley,

who has been successfully studying records for over 20 years!

We live in a marvelous time where so many family records can be found with an online search. Certainly not all, but many basic records are available. If you are a beginner, it is suggested that you follow some basic genealogy guidelines, many of which are freely available. They will contain suggestions that you start with yourself and work back, listing full names, dates (as you know them), and places of birth, marriage, death, residences, etc.

So, where do you look for records?

1906_March_18_Maniscalco_Pietro_Messina_Maria marriage March 18,1906 rec 5,image 190 crp2

 

American Records:

Prior to the internet, finding family records was a painstaking and slow process.  Today many records are available on the internet.  You can search for birth, death, marriage, census and other records for the deceased family members you are searching.  

 

For no cost to you, familysearch.com is a free online research site and of a World Tree project of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS).  Records from around the world have been microfilmed and digitized for many years and are made available at no charge to everyone. There is an ongoing process to digitize all of their microfilmed records, which are available online. Occasionally, some records are restricted for viewing from your home computer, due to a contractual agreement with the repository holding the records. Those records must be accessed at a family history affiliate library. 

There you will be able to search a wide array of records:  the site offers instructional opportunities as well.  There are several pay-to-join sites as well, the most well advertised is ancestry.com.

Sicilian/Italian Records:

In order to find your family’s Sicilian/Italian immigrant records, you need to know the name of the town where they were born and married to generate records. Many immigrant’s U.S. death records only show Italy or Sicily as place of birth and often, no parents’ names.  And remember! Sicilian and Italian Women did not (and still do not) use their married name in Sicily or Italy. Therefore, a married woman is almost always listed by her maiden name on passenger lists even as her children are listed with her under their husband's family name.

Passenger ship lists are a good first place. You can coordinate the possible date of arrival with census records; the records for 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 have an entry column for the date of immigration. The actual date may turn out to be within a few years of any date listed, and the census closest to the immigration date is usually the most accurate in case there is a big difference.  When looking at a passenger ship list, check the last pages of the entire list to the section of Detained Passengers where there is fascinating information about why and for how long and when released. 

The Naturalization Declaration or Petition has information given directly by the immigrant whereas a census record could have been given by another person. The actual Naturalization certificate does not give any details, but the other two will ask about their date and place of birth, marriage date with spouse’s name (sometimes with maiden name) and date and place of birth and children and both ship names and arrival dates. The dates may be off a little, as will the ship names, but usually they are pretty close. 

RIVELI DI BENI E ANIME, POGGIOREALE (TRAPANI), 1714-1816

ITALY, SELECT DEATHS AND BURIALS, 1809-1900

ITALIAN PASSENGERS TO LOUISIANA, 1905-1910

ITALY, TRAPANI, CIVIL REGISTRATION (STATE ARCHIVE), 1906-1928

ITALY, TRAPANI, POGGIOREALE, CIVIL REGISTRATION, COMUNE
(FAMILYSEARCH HISTORICAL RECORDS)